FAQs

Frequently Asked
QUESTIONS

How Do I Settle My Case?

When you're dealing with civil cases such as workers' compensation, personal injury or an auto accident, you may be requested to settle matters out of court. This is the moment we can help you.

You will have lots of questions – because settling is a BIG decision.

Questions You'd Be Asking Yourself:

  • What is my case worth? Do I ask for more?
  • What benefits am I giving up?
  • Do I have to quit my job?
  • How does this affect my future medical treatment?
  • Do I really want to spend all this time fighting in court?
  • Do I want to put my family through a lengthy trial?
At Carrillo & Carrillo Law, we'll meet you personally and discuss each and every aspect of the case in detail. Each case is different from the other, so the results can never be the same. We can provide you elaborate advice based on our experience in and out of the courtroom. We understand this is an emotional time for you and your family. We'll provide all possible guidance through your questions, and explain you all the possibilities to help you make a most-informed decision.

Don't let the hassles prevent you from moving forward. Call Carrillo & Carrillo today for a no charge no commitment consultation.

Answers to Your Legal Questions

I reported my accident to my employer, but I don’t think they’ve reported it to the insurance company yet.
An employee has 30 days to report a claim. After that, it may be denied. Once you report it, your employer now has seven days to forward that information on to the insurance company. 

This should be done right way, so your claim can begin to be processed. If your employer has not reported the accident within the first seven days, you do have the right to contact them yourself.

Will I have to pay my medical bills out of my own pocket?
No. All medical bills should be submitted by the medical provider (doctor, clinic, etc.) to your insurance company for payment. This provider, however, should be authorized by your employer or insurance company.
 
How much will I get paid through my workers’ compensation insurance?
Typically, you will be paid 66 2/3 percent of your average weekly wage. This is paid bi-weekly, or every two weeks. That means if you are making $500 per week, your benefit check for two weeks of lost pay would be $666.60.

When will I get my first check?
Within 21 days of reporting your injury to your employer, you should receive your first check.

What about my Social Security? Can I receive benefit checks from Social Security as well as Workers’ Compensation?
Yes, although the amount you receive for workers’ compensation may be reduced. Your total benefit may not be greater than 80 percent of your average weekly wage prior to your injury.

What do I do if I did not receive my benefit check?
You have the right to call the insurance company. Keep accurate records of contact information for your claims representative. They should be your first call, and remember to keep track of all of your communication with him or her.

Can I be fired over my work-related injury?
It is against the law to fire someone for filing or maintaining a workers’ compensation claim.

I’ve just been denied my workers compensation claim! Do I need to call a lawyer? What can I do?
You do have the option to file a Petition for Benefits within two years of filing your original claim. Hiring an attorney is an important decision and you should ask many questions about the process.

What about a settlement? Can I ask for that?
Certain situations and cases do result in a settlement, but these are not in every case.

I’ve settled my claim with the insurance company and received a lump payment. But now I am still having problems from my injury. Is there anything I can do to help pay my medical bills now?
No. Once a settlement between an employee and an insurance company is reached, the insurance company is no longer responsible for any further payments.
FREE
INITIAL CONSULTATION
Call 352-371-4000
If you're looking for an experienced law firm, choose Carrillo & Carrillo.
Share by: