19 Oct

When to Reject a Settlement Offer for a Personal Injury


Knowing when to reject a settlement offer for a personal injury claim can be difficult since several factors are at play, and it’s always best to work with a personal injury attorney who will know what’s fair, low, and high for a personal injury settlement.

After all, a personal injury can disrupt your daily life from your career to your hobbies, and it includes medical treatments, time off work, and medical bills. A good settlement offer covers your medical expenses, lost wages, and other associated bills.

27 Aug

Will my Personal Injury Case go to Trial?


No, in general, most personal injury cases settle before reaching trial. Statistically, 95% of personal injury cases settle pretrial with only approximately 5% going to trial. Settling before trial tends to save time and money, even when the settlement offer is a hefty sum.

12 Aug

How Insurance Companies Deny Temporary Wage Benefits


Defense counsel routinely uses a number of defenses in order to deny paying temporary benefits to injured workers. These defenses assume your client has already met the threshold requirements for either Temporary Partial Disability (TPD) or Temporary Total Disability (TTD) i.e., restrictions from an authorized treating physician and not at Maximum Medical Improvement (MMI).

There are rare occasions when an injured worker is entitled to TTD but not receiving it while actively employed with the Employer and the Carrier has not asserted an affirmative defense to payment of TTD.

28 Jul

Who Pays for Workers' Compensation


Workers’ compensation offers financial relief to workers who have been injured on the job. It covers a certain amount of medical expenses and sometimes a portion of lost pay. This means that workers can focus on healing rather than their livelihood. But who pays for workers’ compensation?

While it’s possible to file for workers’ compensation without a lawyer, it can significantly streamline and smooth the entire process.

12 Jul

What to Know About a Florida Bodily Injury Claim


A bodily injury claim is most commonly a request for compensation for expenses related to physical injuries that occurred during a car accident. These claims cover medical bills, lost wages, and other injury-related costs. These claims are generally covered by insurance when paid out, whether it’s the injured party’s insurance or the at-fault driver’s insurance.

17 Jun

How is Pain and Suffering Calculated in FL


Accident injuries often include major medical expenses, job pay loss, and long-term recovery. These are, more or less, easily measured for determining how much compensation should be received by the victim. However, in some situations, your situation could be eligible for compensation for your “pain and suffering.”

02 Jun

Physical and Emotional Self-Care Tips After Personal Injury


A personal injury often pauses life as we know it, and that can be hard, especially if the injury makes work and life more challenging. In some personal injury cases, you cannot work at all and most of your time is spent in recovery. Personal injury requires taking time for self-care to expedite a full recovery.
20 May

Average Payout for Florida Personal Injury Claim


For victims of a personal injury in Florida, it’s important to consider the value of a personal injury claim. Settlements vary. However, the value of a claim may be averaged based off of other personal injury settlements.
 

02 May

How To Sue for Personal Injury


Did you know that personal injury is one of the most common situations that result in civil lawsuits? However, not all injuries deserve to be filed as a personal injury claim. It’s crucial to understand the different types of injury claims because each type offers different potential damages, limitation periods, and so much more.

The complexity of the legal system seems daunting, but it also offers relief in light of possible wage loss and healthcare costs.

01 Apr

What is Florida’s PIP 14-Day Rule?


Under Florida’s no-fault system with car accidents, a driver or passenger has 14 days to seek medical attention after a collision to file a claim with the insurance policy. Insurers are likely to deny a claim if you do not see a medical provider within two weeks of the accident. Even if you feel fine, visit your medical provider within two weeks of your accident.